Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians

@article{Qaseem2013ScreeningFP,
  title={Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians},
  author={Amir Qaseem and Michael J. Barry and Thomas D. Denberg and Douglas K. Owens and Paul Shekelle},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={158},
  pages={761 - 769}
}
DESCRIPTION Prostate cancer is an important health problem in men. It rarely causes death in men younger than 50 years; most deaths associated with it occur in men older than 75 years. The benefits of screening with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test are outweighed by the harms for most men. Prostate cancer never becomes clinically significant in a patient's lifetime in a considerable proportion of men with prostate cancer detected with the PSA test. They will receive no benefit and are… 
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TLDR
Men should be informed of the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening before biopsy and the option of active surveillance in lieu of immediate treatment for certain men diagnosed with prostate cancer.
American Cancer Society Guideline for the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: Update 2010
TLDR
It is recommended that asymptomatic men who have at least a 10‐year life expectancy have an opportunity to make an informed decision with their health care provider about screening for prostate cancer after they receive information about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits associated with prostate cancer screening.
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TLDR
Clinicians caring for men, especially African-American men and those with positive family histories, should provide information about potential benefits and risks of prostate cancer screening, and the limitations of current evidence for screening, in order to maximize informed decision making.
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TLDR
Prostate-specific antigen-based screening results in small or no reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality and is associated with harms related to subsequent evaluation and treatments, some of which may be unnecessary.
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TLDR
PSA-based screening reduced the rate of death from prostate cancer by 20% but was associated with a high risk of overdiagnosis.
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TLDR
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Screening for Prostate Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement
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TLDR
The USPSTF recommends against PSA-based screening for prostate cancer (grade D recommendation), which applies to men in the general U.S. population, regardless of age.
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TLDR
Nearly two-thirds of the men referred to urology with an elevated PSA were unaware that they had even had their PSA done, and information about the limitations of PSA testing and the consequence of a positive test result had been deficient.
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