Screening for Dyslipidemia in Younger Adults: A Systematic Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

@article{Chou2016ScreeningFD,
  title={Screening for Dyslipidemia in Younger Adults: A Systematic Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force},
  author={R. Chou and T. Dana and I. Blazina and M. Daeges and C. Bougatsos and Thomas L Jeanne},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={165},
  pages={560-564}
}
Dyslipidemia affects about 53% of U.S. adults (105.3 million) (1). Although dyslipidemia becomes more prevalent with age, it also affects younger adults. About 36% of adults aged 20 to 29 years and 43% aged 30 to 39 years meet levels recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program for all lipids (2). Dyslipidemia is associated with cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. In 2010, the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) was 1.2% among those aged… Expand
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