Screening for Breast Cancer: An Update for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

@article{Nelson2009ScreeningFB,
  title={Screening for Breast Cancer: An Update for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force},
  author={Heidi D. Nelson and K. M. van Tyne and Arpana M. Naik and Christina Bougatsos and Benjamin K. S. Chan and Linda L. Humphrey},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2009},
  volume={151},
  pages={727-737}
}
This systematic evidence review is an update of evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on breast cancer screening for average-risk women (1). In 2002, on the basis of results of a previous review (2, 3), the USPSTF recommended mammography screening, with or without clinical breast examination (CBE), every 1 to 2 years for women aged 40 years or older. They concluded that the evidence was insufficient to recommend for or against routine CBE alone and for or… Expand
Screening for breast cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.
TLDR
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess additional benefits and harms of either digital mammography or magnetic resonance imaging instead of film mammography as screening modalities for breast cancer. Expand
Evidence-Based Breast Cancer Prevention: The Importance of Individual Risk
TLDR
The number of additional breast cancer deaths averted by starting screening mammography at age 40 years is small and that earlier screening involves important harms, so universal screening of women aged 40 to 49 years is not recommended. Expand
Effectiveness of Breast Cancer Screening: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis to Update the 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation
TLDR
This systematic review updates evidence for the USPSTF on the effectiveness of mammography screening in reducing breast cancer mortality, all-cause mortality, and advanced breast cancer for women at average risk and how effectiveness varies by age, risk factors, screening intervals, and imaging modalities. Expand
Evidence for U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations against routine mammography for females between 40-49 years of age.
TLDR
Evidence for updating the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation against routine mammography for females between 40-49 years of age is focused on. Expand
Patient preferences in breast cancer screening: lessons to be learned from the US Preventive Services Task Force.
TLDR
It is concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of clinical breast examination, digital mammography, or magnetic resonance imaging as other screening modalities for breast cancer. Expand
The background review for the USPSTF recommendation on screening for breast cancer.
TLDR
People raising concerns about Nelson and colleagues’ review should be reassured that the summary breast cancer mortality reduction from screening mammography is similar to that presented in the Cochrane review, and leads to similar estimates of the numbers needed to invite for examination to prevent or delay 1 death from breast cancer. Expand
The background review for the USPSTF recommendation on screening for breast cancer.
TLDR
People raising concerns about Nelson and colleagues’ review should be reassured that the summary breast cancer mortality reduction from screening mammography is similar to that presented in the Cochrane review, and leads to similar estimates of the numbers needed to invite for examination to prevent or delay 1 death from breast cancer. Expand
Trends in Breast Cancer Screening: Impact of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations.
TLDR
These data support no perceptible change in U.S. women's patterns of screening mammography age at initiation within 3 years of the USPSTF guideline revision, suggesting a delayed effect of guideline revision in population trends. Expand
Potential Impact of USPSTF Recommendations on Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer
TLDR
Young Hispanic, Asian/PI, and non-Hispanic (NH) Black women in California have greater odds of being diagnosed with early breast cancer than their older counterparts and implementation of USPSTF recommendations could disproportionately impact non-white women and potentially lead to more advanced presentation at diagnosis. Expand
Screening for Breast Cancer
TLDR
The aim was to estimate the NNI adjusted by the follow-up period in each available study to compare NNIs between different age groups and found that the differences in NNI between women aged 40 to 49 years and those aged 50 to 59 years were smaller in the analysis than in Nelson and colleagues’ report. Expand
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References

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Breast Cancer Screening: A Summary of the Evidence for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
TLDR
The goal was to critically appraise and synthesize evidence about the overall effectiveness of breast cancer screening, as well as its effectiveness among women younger than 50 years of age, and to evaluate previous meta-analyses of these trials and of screening test characteristics and studies evaluating the harms associated with false-positive test results. Expand
Screening for Breast Cancer: Recommendations and Rationale
TLDR
The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to recommend for or against routine CBE alone to screen for breast cancer, and recommends screening mammography, with or without clinical breast examination (CBE), every 1 to 2 years for women aged 40 and older. Expand
Trends in mammography and clinical breast examination: a population-based study.
TLDR
Despite well-established clinical guidelines for early detection of breast cancer, there has been a decline in the rates of annual mammography and clinical breast exam in women over the age of 40 over the past 5 years. Expand
American Cancer Society Guidelines for Breast Screening with MRI as an Adjunct to Mammography
TLDR
There are several risk subgroups for which the available data are insufficient to recommend for or against screening, including women with a personal history of breast cancer, carcinoma in situ, atypical hyperplasia, and extremely dense breasts on mammography. Expand
Preventive health care, 2001 update: should women be routinely taught breast self-examination to screen for breast cancer?
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  • CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne
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TLDR
The evidence relating to the effectiveness of breast self-examination (BSE) to screen for breast cancer and to provide recommendations for routine teaching of BSE to women in various age groups as part of a periodic health examination are evaluated. Expand
Breast self-examination and death from breast cancer: a meta-analysis
TLDR
Regular BSE is not an effective method of reducing breast cancer mortality, and following recent controversy over the efficacy of mammography, it may be seen as an alternative. Expand
Screening Mammography in Women 40 to 49 Years of Age: A Systematic Review for the American College of Physicians
Key Summary Points Meta-analyses of randomized, controlled trials demonstrate a 7% to 23% reduction in breast cancer mortality rates from screening mammography in women 40 to 49 years of age.Expand
Routine screening mammography in women older than 74 years: a review of the available data.
TLDR
Regular mammography screening in older women may be associated with an earlier-stage disease and lower breast cancer mortality, and data support the use of screening mammography above age 75 years based on individual evaluations, rather than setting an upper age limit for breast cancer screening. Expand
Comparison of screening mammography in the United States and the United kingdom.
TLDR
Recall and negative open surgical biopsy rates are twice as high in US settings than in the United Kingdom but cancer detection rates are similar; efforts to improve US mammographic screening should target lowering the recall rate without reducing the cancer detection rate. Expand
Mammography before diagnosis among women age 80 years and older with breast cancer.
TLDR
Regular mammography among women >or= 80 years of age was associated with earlier disease stage, although improved survival remains difficult to demonstrate. Expand
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