Screening and prostate-cancer mortality in a randomized European study.

@article{Schrder2009ScreeningAP,
  title={Screening and prostate-cancer mortality in a randomized European study.},
  author={Fritz H. Schr{\"o}der and Jonas Hugosson and Monique J. Roobol and Teuvo L.J. Tammela and Stefano Ciatto and V. J. Nelen and Maciej Kwiatkowski and M Luj{\'a}n and Hans G. Lilja and Marco Antonio Zappa and Louis J. Denis and Franz Recker and Antonio Berenguer and Liisa M{\"a}{\"a}tt{\"a}nen and Chris H. Bangma and Gunnar Aus and Arnauld Villers and Xavier R{\'e}billard and Theodorus H. van der Kwast and Bert G. Blijenberg and Sue Moss and Harry J. de Koning and Anssi Auvinen},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2009},
  volume={360 13},
  pages={
          1320-8
        }
}
BACKGROUND The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer was initiated in the early 1990s to evaluate the effect of screening with prostate-specific-antigen (PSA) testing on death rates from prostate cancer. METHODS We identified 182,000 men between the ages of 50 and 74 years through registries in seven European countries for inclusion in our study. The men were randomly assigned to a group that was offered PSA screening at an average of once every 4 years or to a control… 

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