Corpus ID: 3153042

ScreenAvoider: Protecting Computer Screens from Ubiquitous Cameras

@article{Korayem2014ScreenAvoiderPC,
  title={ScreenAvoider: Protecting Computer Screens from Ubiquitous Cameras},
  author={Mohammed Korayem and Robert Templeman and Dennis Chen and David J. Crandall and Apu Kapadia},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2014},
  volume={abs/1412.0008}
}
We live and work in environments that are inundated with cameras embedded in devices such as phones, tablets, laptops, and monitors. Newer wearable devices like Google Glass, Narrative Clip, and Autographer offer the ability to quietly log our lives with cameras from a `first person' perspective. While capturing several meaningful and interesting moments, a significant number of images captured by these wearable cameras can contain computer screens. Given the potentially sensitive information… Expand
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