Screen Time and Health Indicators Among Children and Youth: Current Evidence, Limitations and Future Directions

@article{Saunders2016ScreenTA,
  title={Screen Time and Health Indicators Among Children and Youth: Current Evidence, Limitations and Future Directions},
  author={Travis J Saunders and Jeff K. Vallance},
  journal={Applied Health Economics and Health Policy},
  year={2016},
  volume={15},
  pages={323-331}
}
Despite accumulating evidence linking screen-based sedentary behaviours (i.e. screen time) with poorer health outcomes among children and youth <18 years of age, the prevalence of these behaviours continues to increase, with roughly half of children and youth exceeding the public health screen time recommendation of 2 h per day or less. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of key research initiatives aimed at understanding the associations between screen time and health… 
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