Scratching the (lateral) surface of chromatin regulation by histone modifications

@article{Tropberger2013ScratchingT,
  title={Scratching the (lateral) surface of chromatin regulation by histone modifications},
  author={Philipp Tropberger and R. Schneider},
  journal={Nature Structural &Molecular Biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={20},
  pages={657-661}
}
  • Philipp Tropberger, R. Schneider
  • Published 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature Structural &Molecular Biology
  • Histones have two structurally and functionally distinct domains: globular domains forming the nucleosomal core around which DNA is wrapped and unstructured tails protruding from the nucleosomal core. Whereas post-translational modifications (PTMs) in histone tails are well studied, much less is currently known about histone-core PTMs. Many core PTMs map to residues located on the lateral surface of the histone octamer, close to the DNA, and they have the potential to alter intranucleosomal… CONTINUE READING
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