Scientific Revolution in the Lab: Mad Scientists’ Labs in Victorian Novels

@article{ChooJaeuk2012ScientificRI,
  title={Scientific Revolution in the Lab: Mad Scientists’ Labs in Victorian Novels},
  author={ChooJaeuk},
  journal={The Journal of English Language and Literature},
  year={2012},
  volume={58},
  pages={305-325}
}
  • ChooJaeuk
  • Published 1 June 2012
  • Art
  • The Journal of English Language and Literature
1 Citations
Annual Bibliography for 2012
The annual bibliography of the Keats-Shelley Journal catalogues recent scholarship related to British Romanticism, with emphasis on secondgeneration writers—particularly John Keats, Percy Shelley,

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