Science deficiency in conservation practice: the monitoring of tiger populations in India

@article{Karanth2003ScienceDI,
  title={Science deficiency in conservation practice: the monitoring of tiger populations in India},
  author={K Ullas Karanth and James D. Nichols and John Seidenstricker and Eric Dinerstein and James L. D. Smith and Charles McDougal and A. J. T. Johnsingh and Raghunandan Singh Chundawat and Valmik Thapar},
  journal={Animal Conservation},
  year={2003},
  volume={6}
}
Conservation practices are supposed to get refined by advancing scientific knowledge. We study this phenomenon in the context of monitoring tiger populations in India, by evaluating the ‘pugmark census method’ employed by wildlife managers for three decades. We use an analytical framework of modern animal population sampling to test the efficacy of the pugmark censuses using scientific data on tigers and our field observations. We identify three critical goals for monitoring tiger populations… 
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