Corpus ID: 14463435

Science concept 2: The structure and composition of the lunar interior provide fundamental information on the evolution of a differentiated planetary body

@inproceedings{Barnes2012ScienceC2,
  title={Science concept 2: The structure and composition of the lunar interior provide fundamental information on the evolution of a differentiated planetary body},
  author={J. Barnes and R. French and J. Garber and W. Poole and P. Smith and Y. Tian},
  year={2012}
}
  • J. Barnes, R. French, +3 authors Y. Tian
  • Published 2012
  • Geography
  • Each of the Science Goals addressed by Science Concept 2 is linked: data regarding the crust, mantle, and core must be obtained in order to understand the thermal state of the interior and the planetary heat engine. Much about these Science Goals is currently unknown: crustal thickness and lateral variability are constrained by gravity and seismic models which suffer from non-uniqueness and a lack of control points; mantle composition is ambiguously estimated from seismic velocity profiles and… CONTINUE READING

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