Science and public policy

@article{Nielsen2020ScienceAP,
  title={Science and public policy},
  author={Kristian H. Nielsen},
  journal={Metascience},
  year={2020},
  pages={1 - 3}
}
This is a crucial moment in time for science and public policy. The ongoing COVID19 crisis certainly has exacerbated the importance of the issues covered by the Handbook under review here: How scientific expertise interacts in a meaningful way with policy-making; how science policy allows for proper governance of scientific research without putting the intellectual and moral independence of academic institutions at risk; and how scientific institutions respond to humanitarian, societal, and… 

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
Growth rates of modern science: A bibliometric analysis based on the number of publications and cited references
TLDR
This study looked at the rate at which science has grown since the mid‐1600s and identified three essential growth phases: from less than 1% up to the middle of the 18th century, to 2 to 3%up to the period between the two world wars, and 8 to 9% to 2010.
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