Science, pseudoscience, and anomaly

@article{Alcock1998SciencePA,
  title={Science, pseudoscience, and anomaly},
  author={James E. Alcock},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={1998},
  volume={21},
  pages={303 - 303}
}
  • J. Alcock
  • Published 1 April 1998
  • Psychology
  • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
My criticisms of parapsychology are neither based on its subject matter per se, nor simply on a charge of sloppy research, but rather on the whole pattern of theory and research in this domain. The lack of a positive definition of psi, the use of ad hoc principles such as psi-missing and the experimenter psi effect to account for failures to confirm hypotheses, and the failure to produce a single phenomenon that can be replicated by neutral investigators are among the major problems that keep… 
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In this paper I examine the phenomenon of “uncanny” unconscious communication and the plausibility of “telepathic” interconnectivity between patient and therapist. While reexamining long-standing