• Corpus ID: 19842275

School Size and Youth Violence: The Mediating Role of School Connectedness

@article{Volungis2016SchoolSA,
  title={School Size and Youth Violence: The Mediating Role of School Connectedness},
  author={Adam M. Volungis},
  journal={North American Journal of Psychology},
  year={2016},
  volume={18},
  pages={123}
}
  • Adam M. Volungis
  • Published 1 March 2016
  • Psychology
  • North American Journal of Psychology
Violence in some form has always existed in our schools and communities, but highly publicized shootings in the 1990s, such as Littleton, Colorado, Jonesboro, Arkansas, and Paducah, Kentucky have led to increased public awareness and concern (Modzeleski et al., 2008). In 2001, the Surgeon General concluded that youth violence is a public health concern in the United States (U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001). Interestingly, although school and community violent crimes… 

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School size and youth violence
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