Schizophrenia and migration: a meta-analysis and review.

@article{CantorGraae2005SchizophreniaAM,
  title={Schizophrenia and migration: a meta-analysis and review.},
  author={Elizabeth Cantor-Graae and Jean-Paul Selten},
  journal={The American journal of psychiatry},
  year={2005},
  volume={162 1},
  pages={
          12-24
        }
}
OBJECTIVE The authors synthesize findings of previous studies implicating migration as a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and provide a quantitative index of the associated effect size. METHOD MEDLINE was searched for population-based incidence studies concerning migrants in English-language publications appearing between the years 1977 and 2003. Article bibliographies and an Australian database were cross-referenced. Studies were included if incidence reports provided… 

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