Schizophrenia—an evolutionary enigma?

@article{Brne2004SchizophreniaanEE,
  title={Schizophrenia—an evolutionary enigma?},
  author={Martin Br{\"u}ne},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={41-53}
}
  • M. Brüne
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews
The term 'schizophrenia' refers to a group of disorders that have been described in every human culture. Two apparently well established findings have corroborated the need for an evolutionary explanation of these disorders: (1) cross-culturally stable incidence rates and (2) decreased fecundity of the affected individuals. The rationale behind this relates to the evolutionary paradox that susceptibility genes for schizophrenia are obviously preserved in the human genepool, despite fundamental… Expand
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