Scanning the horizon: towards transparent and reproducible neuroimaging research

@article{Poldrack2017ScanningTH,
  title={Scanning the horizon: towards transparent and reproducible neuroimaging research},
  author={Russell A. Poldrack and Chris Ian Baker and Joke Durnez and Krzysztof J. Gorgolewski and Paul M. Matthews and Marcus Robert Munafo and Thomas E. Nichols and J B Poline and Edward Vul and Tal Yarkoni},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2017},
  volume={18},
  pages={115-126}
}
Functional neuroimaging techniques have transformed our ability to probe the neurobiological basis of behaviour and are increasingly being applied by the wider neuroscience community. However, concerns have recently been raised that the conclusions that are drawn from some human neuroimaging studies are either spurious or not generalizable. Problems such as low statistical power, flexibility in data analysis, software errors and a lack of direct replication apply to many fields, but perhaps… 
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