Scaling of cursoriality in mammals

@article{Steudel1993ScalingOC,
  title={Scaling of cursoriality in mammals},
  author={Karen L. Steudel and J. Beattie},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={1993},
  volume={217}
}
Data on limb bone lengths from 64 mammalian species were combined with data on 114 bovid species (Scott, '79) to assess the scaling of limb lengths and proportions in mammals ranging from 0.002 to 364 kg. We analyzed log‐transformed data using both reduced major axis and least‐squares regression to focus on the distribution across mammals of two key traits—limb length and metatarsal/femur ratio—associated with cursorial adaptation. The total lengths of both fore and hindlimbs scale in a manner… Expand
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