Scaling of Sexual Dimorphism in Body Mass: A Phylogenetic Analysis of Rensch's Rule in Primates

@article{Smith2004ScalingOS,
  title={Scaling of Sexual Dimorphism in Body Mass: A Phylogenetic Analysis of Rensch's Rule in Primates},
  author={Richard J. Smith and J. Cheverud},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={1095-1135}
}
We examined the relationship between body mass dimorphism, measured as the natural logarithm of the male/female ratio, and body mass, defined as ln (female mass), with interspecific allometry, phylogenetically independent contrasts, and phylogenetic autocorrelation in 105 primate species. We repeated the analyses for Strepsirhini (N = 23), Haplorhini (N = 82), Platyrrhinii (N = 32), and Catarrhini (N = 47). With independent contrasts, there is statistically significant (p < .05) positive… Expand
Rensch’s rule in avian lice: contradictory allometric trends for sexual size dimorphism
TLDR
The results indicate that philopterid and menoponid lice follow RR, while ricinids exhibit the opposite pattern, arguing that larger-bodied bird species tend to host lice that are both larger in size and more abundant. Expand
Scaling of Size and Dimorphism in Primates II: Macroevolution
  • A. Gordon
  • International Journal of Primatology
  • 2005
Previous researchers found positive scaling of body size and sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in primates, known as Rensch's rule. The pattern is present in Haplorhini, but absent in Strepsirhini. IExpand
Rensch's rule, Bergmann's effect and adult sexual dimorphism in wild monogamous owl monkeys (Aotus azarai) of Argentina.
TLDR
The data illustrate the complexities inherent in examining and summarizing within population variation in skeletal and nonskeletal measurements and contribute to a better understanding of the relationships between monogamous behavioral patterns and sexual dimorphism. Expand
Human size evolution: no evolutionary allometric relationship between male and female stature.
TLDR
The hypothesis of an allometric relationship between the sexes using phylogenetic methodology is re-examine, finding no support for the idea that sexual dimorphism increases with increasing stature in humans. Expand
Sexual size dimorphism and sex ratio in arthropod ectoparasites: contrasting patterns at different hierarchical scales.
TLDR
Some macroecological patterns differ between ectoparasite taxa exploiting the same hosts (allometry in sexual size dimorphism), whereas other patterns are similar (sexual sizeDimorphism-sex ratio relationship in infrapopulations), and some patterns are scale-dependent and may demonstrate the opposite trends in parasite populations at different hierarchical levels. Expand
Sexual dimorphism of body size in an African fossil ape, Nacholapithecus kerioi.
TLDR
The magnitude of dimorphism inferred here cannot be associated with a gorilla-like polygynous or oranguran-like solitary/fission-fusion social structure, and may reflect either taphonomic bias, or some other social structure. Expand
A test of Rensch's rule in varanid lizards
TLDR
Estimates of the reduced major axis regression slopes of the allometric relationship between male and female body size are significantly higher than unity, and unequivocally corroborate the validity of Rensch’s rule in this reptilian group. Expand
Pattern of sexual size dimorphism supports the inverse of Rensch’s rule in two frog species
TLDR
The results suggest that females living in adverse climates in high altitudes cannot adjust their body size as plastically as males. Expand
Allometry for Sexual Size Dimorphism: Testing Two Hypotheses for Rensch’s Rule in the Water Strider Aquarius remigis
TLDR
The results support a novel interpretation of the differential‐plasticity hypothesis: that the traits most closely associated with reproductive fitness are “adaptively canalized” among populations of the water strider Aquarius remigis. Expand
Sexual size dimorphism and Rensch's rule in Canidae
TLDR
Examining the variation in body size and SSD of 33 species of canids from estimates of body mass and body length found the existence of correlation between body weight and SSD, although the SSDs from these estimators are uncorrelated. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 92 REFERENCES
Scaling of sexual dimorphism in body size and breeding system in primates
TLDR
It is argued here that there is a strong relationship between polygyny and positive allometry for sexual dimorphism in body size, and this evidence is based on an analysis of the relationship between the scaling of sexualDimorphisms in body weight and the breeding system for 53 primate species, which in most cases coincide with those chosen by Clutton-Brock et al.4 for their study. Expand
A Comparative Analysis of Allometry for Sexual Size Dimorphism: Assessing Rensch's Rule
TLDR
Rensch's rule is shown to be associated with male-biased SSD, which is consistent with the hypothesis that sexual selection acting on male size drives the evolution of this pattern of allometry. Expand
Phylogenetic analyses of primate size evolution: the consequences of sexual selection
TLDR
An independent contrast analysis of male and female size (log weight) showed that these are tightly correlated and that size dimorphism is not a simple allometric function of size, and the directional investigation indicates that the magnitude of change in haplorhine dimorphisms is larger after an increase in sexual selection than after a decrease. Expand
Allometry for Sexual Size Dimorphism: Pattern and Process in the Coevolution of Body Size in Males and Females
Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is common in both plants and animals, and current evidence suggests that it reflects the adaptation of males and females to their different reproductive roles. WhenExpand
Evolution of sexual dimorphism in body weight in platyrrhines
  • S. M. Ford
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of primatology
  • 1994
TLDR
It is suggested that sexual selection is the primary determinant of degree and pattern of sexual dimorphism in platyrrhines, but that there is also a dietary effect and natural selection may have some effect, although not the parameters analyzed here. Expand
The evolution of sexual size dimorphism in prosimian primates
  • P. Kappeler
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of primatology
  • 1990
TLDR
In prosimians, inter‐specific differences in sexual dimorphism were not correlated with variance in male reproductive success, and it is suggested that speed and agility of males, rather than size and strength, might have been favored by intra‐sexual selection in most prosimian primates. Expand
SEXUAL DIMORPHISM, MATING SYSTEM AND BODY SIZE IN NEW WORLD BLACKBIRDS (ICTERINAE)
  • M. Webster
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1992
TLDR
It is argued that it is inappropriate to assume that associations between a trait and body size or phylogeny are evidence of nonadaptive evolutionary “constraints,” and suggested that large body size itself, or the ecology of large species, promotes the development of coloniality and a polygynous mating system. Expand
Statistics of sexual size dimorphism.
  • R. Smith
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of human evolution
  • 1999
TLDR
Most of the ratios used in the SSD literature are unnecessary, and several commonly used ratios are statistically inferior to others, and most of the questions for which residuals are used should be addressed by multiple regression. Expand
Sexual-Size Dimorphism: Influence of Mass and Mating Systems in the Most Dimorphic Mammals
TLDR
Characteristics and testing for associations among the most dimorphic mammalian taxa—Macropodidae, Primates, Mustelidae, Pinnipedia, Elephantidae, Ruminantia, found that ruminants with tending and harem mating systems were moreDimorphic than those with territorial polygynous and monogamous mating systems. Expand
Degrees of freedom in interspecific allometry: an adjustment for the effects of phylogenetic constraint.
  • R. Smith
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1994
TLDR
Analysis of two data sets, using taxonomy to define levels of the nested hierarchy, suggests that it has been common for published studies of interspecific allometry to severely overestimate the number of degrees of freedom. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...