Scales and Tooth Whorls of Ancient Fishes Challenge Distinction between External and Oral ‘Teeth’

@article{Qu2013ScalesAT,
  title={Scales and Tooth Whorls of Ancient Fishes Challenge Distinction between External and Oral ‘Teeth’},
  author={Qingming Qu and S. Sanchez and H. Blom and P. Tafforeau and P. Ahlberg},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2013},
  volume={8}
}
The debate about the origin of the vertebrate dentition has been given fresh fuel by new fossil discoveries and developmental studies of extant animals. Odontodes (teeth or tooth-like structures) can be found in two distinct regions, the ‘internal’ oropharyngeal cavity and the ‘external’ skin. A recent hypothesis argues that regularly patterned odontodes is a specific oropharyngeal feature, whereas odontodes in the external skeleton lack this organization. However, this argument relies on the… Expand
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