Scale microornamentation of uropeltid snakes

@article{Gower2003ScaleMO,
  title={Scale microornamentation of uropeltid snakes},
  author={David J. Gower},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2003},
  volume={258}
}
  • D. Gower
  • Published 1 November 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Morphology
Microornamentation was examined on the exposed oberhautchen surface of dorsal, lateral, and ventral scales from the midbody region of 20 species of the fossorial snake family Uropeltidae and seven species of fossorial scolecophidian and anilioid outgroups. No substantial variation was observed in microornamentation from the different areas around the midbody circumference within species. All oberhautchen cells were flat and exhibited no major surface features other than occasional posterior… Expand
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