Scale-free networks in cell biology

@article{Albert2005ScalefreeNI,
  title={Scale-free networks in cell biology},
  author={R{\'e}ka Albert},
  journal={Journal of Cell Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={118},
  pages={4947 - 4957}
}
  • R. Albert
  • Published 28 October 2005
  • Biology
  • Journal of Cell Science
A cell's behavior is a consequence of the complex interactions between its numerous constituents, such as DNA, RNA, proteins and small molecules. Cells use signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms to coordinate multiple processes, allowing them to respond to and adapt to an ever-changing environment. The large number of components, the degree of interconnectivity and the complex control of cellular networks are becoming evident in the integrated genomic and proteomic analyses that are… 
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