• Corpus ID: 132374419

Saturn northern hemisphere's atmosphere and polar hexagon in 2013

@inproceedings{Delcroix2013SaturnNH,
  title={Saturn northern hemisphere's atmosphere and polar hexagon in 2013},
  author={Marc Delcroix and Padma Yanamandra-Fisher and Georg Fischer and Leigh N. Fletcher and Kunio M. Sayanagi and T L Barry},
  year={2013}
}
In 2013, two years after the dramatic events of the Great White Spot (GWS), amateur astronomers continued to follow the evolution of the “GWS zone” centered around 41° planetographic on Saturn. They could also detect the hexagonal wave surrounding Saturn’s north pole with a spot at its edge. 
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