Satisfaction with care: the role of patient-provider racial/ethnic concordance and interpersonal sensitivity.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE This study examined how patients' satisfaction with their care is affected by racial/ethnic concordance and patients' perceived interpersonal sensitivity of their providers. The sample consisted of non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans/Blacks, Hispanics/Latinos, and Asian Americans age 50 and older. METHOD Data came from the population-based Commonwealth Fund 2001 Health Care Quality Survey (n=2,075). A hierarchical regression model of satisfaction was estimated for each racial/ethnic group with a sequential entry of variables: demographic and health-related variables, racial/ethnic concordance between patient and provider, and interpersonal sensitivity. RESULTS The influence of patient-provider racial/ethnic concordance on satisfaction with care was negligible, but the influence of interpersonal sensitivity was substantial (p<.001) in all racial/ethnic groups. DISCUSSION Findings suggest that racial/ethnic concordance may not be universally effective for diverse older populations, but perceived interpersonal sensitivity of the provider has a strong influence on older adults' satisfaction with care regardless of their racial/ethnic background.

Cite this paper

@article{Phillips2012SatisfactionWC, title={Satisfaction with care: the role of patient-provider racial/ethnic concordance and interpersonal sensitivity.}, author={Karon L. Phillips and David A. Chiriboga and Yuri Jang}, journal={Journal of aging and health}, year={2012}, volume={24 7}, pages={1079-90} }