Satisfaction (not) guaranteed: re-evaluating the use of animal models of type 1 diabetes

@article{Roep2004SatisfactionG,
  title={Satisfaction (not) guaranteed: re-evaluating the use of animal models of type 1 diabetes},
  author={Bart O. Roep and Mark A. Atkinson and Matthias G. von Herrath},
  journal={Nature Reviews Immunology},
  year={2004},
  volume={4},
  pages={989-997}
}
Without a doubt, rodent models have been instrumental in describing pathways that lead to pancreatic β-cell destruction, evaluating potential causes of type 1 diabetes and providing proof-of-principle for the potential of immune-based interventions. However, despite more than two decades of productive research, we are still yet to define an initiating autoantigen for the human disease, to determine the precise mechanisms of β-cell destruction in humans and to design interventions that prevent… 
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