Sample size, timing, and other confounding factors: Toward a fair assessment of stay‐at‐home orders

@article{Besanon2021SampleST,
  title={Sample size, timing, and other confounding factors: Toward a fair assessment of stay‐at‐home orders},
  author={Lonni Besançon and Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz and Antoine Flahault},
  journal={European Journal of Clinical Investigation},
  year={2021},
  volume={51}
}
The small sample size (n=10) and the sample's composition have not been justified and introduce a lack of representativeness. Brauner et al. [2] (n=41), along with others, present contradictory results with bigger samples that are not discussed in the manuscript. The authors do not present adequate reasoning for such a small pool of data and exclude numerous countries that provide similarly appropriate data (e.g., Switzerland by canton). Given the small sample size, the study is also at a very… 
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The most restrictive nonpharmaceutical interventions for controlling the spread of COVID‐19 are mandatory stay‐at‐home and business closures and the effects on epidemic case growth of more restrictive NPIs above and beyond those of less‐restrictive NPIs (lrNPIs).
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Students in greater Seoul return to school as virus slows, learning gap widens
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    COVID-19 in children and Adolescents: A knowledge summary -V2