Salutary Lessons: Native Police and the ‘Civilising’ Role of Legalised Violence in Colonial Australia

@article{Nettelbeck2018SalutaryLN,
  title={Salutary Lessons: Native Police and the ‘Civilising’ Role of Legalised Violence in Colonial Australia},
  author={A. Nettelbeck and Lyndall Ryan},
  journal={The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History},
  year={2018},
  volume={46},
  pages={47 - 68}
}
ABSTRACT Over much of the nineteenth century, recurring problems of covert and opportunistic conflict between settlers and Indigenous peoples produced considerable debate across the British settler world about how frontier violence could be legally curbed. At the same time, the difficulty of imposing a rule of law on new frontiers was often seen by colonial states as justification for the imposition of order through force. Examining all the mainland Australian colonies from the 1830s to the end… Expand
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