Salivary cortisol and short and long-term memory for emotional faces in healthy young women

@article{Putman2004SalivaryCA,
  title={Salivary cortisol and short and long-term memory for emotional faces in healthy young women},
  author={Peter Putman and Jack van Honk and Roy P. C. Kessels and Martijn J. Mulder and H. P. F. Koppeschaar},
  journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology},
  year={2004},
  volume={29},
  pages={953-960}
}
Elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol are associated with increased episodic memory for emotional events. Elevated levels of cortisol are also seen in anxiety and depression disorders. Because it is well documented how both depression and anxiety are related to valence-specific biases in attention and memory, the present study sought to establish relations between basal cortisol levels and episodic memory for neutral, positive and negative stimuli. Thirty-nine healthy young women… Expand
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