Salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) go for more: rudiments of number in an amphibian

@article{Uller2003SalamandersC,
  title={Salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) go for more: rudiments of number in an amphibian},
  author={Claudia Uller and Robert G. Jaeger and Gena Guidry and Carolyn Martin},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={105-112}
}
Techniques traditionally used in developmental research with infants have been widely used with nonhuman primates in the investigation of comparative cognitive abilities. Recently, researchers have shown that human infants and monkeys select the larger of two numerosities in a spontaneous forced-choice discrimination task. Here we adopt the same method to assess in a series of experiments spontaneous choice of the larger of two numerosities in a species of amphibian, red-backed salamanders… 
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  • Psychology, Medicine
    Animal Cognition
  • 2007
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