Safety of propofol in cirrhotic patients undergoing colonoscopy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography: results of a prospective controlled study

@article{Fag2012SafetyOP,
  title={Safety of propofol in cirrhotic patients undergoing colonoscopy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography: results of a prospective controlled study},
  author={Emanuela Fag{\`a} and Mariella De Cento and C. Giordanino and C. Barletti and M. Bruno and P. Carucci and C. D. De Angelis and W. Debernardi Venon and A. Musso and D. Reggio and S. Fagoonee and R. Pellicano and S. Ceretto and G. Ciccone and M. Rizzetto and G. Saracco},
  journal={European Journal of Gastroenterology \& Hepatology},
  year={2012},
  volume={24},
  pages={70–76}
}
Background and aims Safety of propofol sedation in patients with liver cirrhosis undergoing colonoscopy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains to be studied. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of propofol is safe for endoscopic procedures more complex than gastroscopy in patients with liver cirrhosis in a prospective controlled study. Methods Two hundred and fourteen consecutive patients, with or without cirrhosis, who underwent colonoscopy or… Expand
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