Safety of Vaccines Used for Routine Immunization of US Children: A Systematic Review

@article{Maglione2014SafetyOV,
  title={Safety of Vaccines Used for Routine Immunization of US Children: A Systematic Review},
  author={Margaret A Maglione and Lopamudra Das and Laura B. Raaen and Alex Smith and Ramya Chari and Sydne Newberry and Roberta M. Shanman and Tanja Perry and Matthew Bidwell Goetz and Courtney Gidengil},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2014},
  volume={134},
  pages={325 - 337}
}
BACKGROUND: Concerns about vaccine safety have led some parents to decline recommended vaccination of their children, leading to the resurgence of diseases. Reassurance of vaccine safety remains critical for population health. This study systematically reviewed the literature on the safety of routine vaccines recommended for children in the United States. METHODS: Data sources included PubMed, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices statements, package inserts, existing reviews… Expand
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