Safety of Newer Antidepressants in Pregnancy

@article{Way2007SafetyON,
  title={Safety of Newer Antidepressants in Pregnancy},
  author={Cynthia M Way},
  journal={Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy},
  year={2007},
  volume={27}
}
  • Cynthia M Way
  • Published 2007
  • Medicine
  • Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy
Pharmacotherapy for depression is often necessary during pregnancy. The information available about use of the newer antidepressants in pregnant women is limited by trial design and lack of long‐term follow‐up of exposed infants. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are not generally thought to be major teratogens. Some recent studies, however, have suggested that paroxetine may be associated with a small increase in risk of congenital abnormalities, particularly cardiac defects… Expand
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