Safety of Green Tea Extracts

@article{Sarma2008SafetyOG,
  title={Safety of Green Tea Extracts},
  author={D. Sarma and M. Barrett and M. Chavez and P. Gardiner and R. Ko and G. Mahady and R. Marles and L. S. Pellicore and G. Giancaspro and T. L. Dog},
  journal={Drug Safety},
  year={2008},
  volume={31},
  pages={469-484}
}
Green tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze] is the fourth most commonly used dietary supplement in the US. Recently, regulatory agencies in France and Spain suspended market authorization of a weight-loss product containing green tea extract because of hepatotoxicity concerns. This was followed by publication of adverse event case reports involving green tea products. In response, the US Pharmacopeia (USP) Dietary Supplement Information Expert Committee (DSI EC) systematically reviewed the safety… Expand
Hepatotoxicity of green tea: an update
TLDR
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A subacute toxicity evaluation of green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract in mice.
TLDR
The results showed that oral administration of green tea Extract did not cause adverse effects on body weight, organ weights, hematology, serum biochemistry, urinalysis or histopathology, and administering green tea extract via gavage significantly reduced triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Expand
Green tea extract: a potential cause of acute liver failure.
TLDR
A case of acute impending liver failure in an adolescent male using a weight-loss product containing green tea extract is presented and the need to be aware of not just green tea Extract, but the importance of monitoring patient use of all dietary supplements and herbal products is emphasized. Expand
Safety Assessment of Camellia sinensis–Derived Ingredients As Used in Cosmetics
TLDR
The Panel concluded that the C sinensis leaf-derived ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment when formulated to be nonsensitizing, however, the available data are insufficient to determine whether the non-leaf-derived Ingredients are safe for use in cosmetics. Expand
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TLDR
This analysis finds that certain catechins of camellia sinensis and interactions at the cellular and mitochondrial levels may be responsible for this toxicity, and social and political preventive measures regarding intake of this natural product at levels can be justified. Expand
Concentrated green tea extract induces severe acute hepatitis in a 63-year-old woman--a case report with pharmaceutical analysis.
TLDR
A typical reversible course of severe hepatitis after green tea consumption is presented in a 63-year old woman during treatment with green tea-capsules upon recommendation of a cancer support group and underlines the importance of public awareness in the potential risks in use of herbal products. Expand
The safety of green tea and green tea extract consumption in adults – Results of a systematic review
TLDR
Toxico‐ and pharmacokinetic evidence further suggests internal dose of catechins is a key determinant in the occurrence and severity of hepatotoxicity and TEs closely reflecting that of traditional infusions in composition and ingestion mode are safe. Expand
The safety and regulation of natural products used as foods and food ingredients.
TLDR
This review addresses the safety assessment and regulation of food products containing these substances by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and addresses the FDA experience in analyzing the safety of natural ingredients described in pre-market safety submissions. Expand
Scientific opinion on the safety of green tea catechins
TLDR
There is evidence from interventional clinical trials that intake of doses equal or above 800 mg EGCG/day taken as a food supplement has been shown to induce a statistically significant increase of serum transaminases in treated subjects compared to control. Expand
Green tea extract-patents and diversity of uses.
TLDR
The target of this review is to present the various patents related to the extraction methods and their claims, and to discuss the evidence found in the literature about the pharmacological activities of green tea. Expand
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