Safety issues with ethanol as an excipient in drugs intended for pediatric use

@article{Zuccotti2011SafetyIW,
  title={Safety issues with ethanol as an excipient in drugs intended for pediatric use},
  author={Gianna Zuccotti and Valentina Fabiano},
  journal={Expert Opinion on Drug Safety},
  year={2011},
  volume={10},
  pages={499 - 502}
}
Ethanol is commonly used as an excipient in the manufacture of medicines, including the ones intended for administration in children. However, ethanol cannot be considered an inert substance; on the contrary, its use in pharmaceutical preparations is associated with safety issues. Newborns, infants and children are not able to metabolize ethanol as efficiently as adults; as a consequence, they may be at higher risk of both acute and chronic alcohol-related toxicities. 
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