Safety and feasibility of CRISPR-edited T cells in patients with refractory non-small-cell lung cancer

@article{Lu2020SafetyAF,
  title={Safety and feasibility of CRISPR-edited T cells in patients with refractory non-small-cell lung cancer},
  author={You Lu and Jianxin Xue and Tao Deng and Xiao-juan Zhou and Kun Yu and Lei Deng and Meijuan Huang and Xin Yi and Mao-zhi Liang and Yu Wang and Haige Shen and Ruizhan Tong and Wenbo Wang and Liwei Li and Jin Song and Jing Li and Xiaoxing Su and Zhenyu Ding and Youling Gong and Jiang Zhu and Yongsheng Wang and Bingwen Zou and Yi-ping Zhang and Yanying Li and Lin Zhou and Yongmei Liu and Min Yu and Yuqi Wang and Xuanwei Zhang and Limei Yin and Xuefeng Xia and Yong-Chang Zeng and Qiao Zhou and Binwu Ying and Chong Chen and Yu-Quan Wei and Weimin Li and Tony Mok},
  journal={Nature Medicine},
  year={2020},
  volume={26},
  pages={732-740}
}
Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–Cas9 editing of immune checkpoint genes could improve the efficacy of T cell therapy, but the first necessary undertaking is to understand the safety and feasibility. Here, we report results from a first-in-human phase I clinical trial of CRISPR–Cas9 PD-1 -edited T cells in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02793856 ). Primary endpoints were safety and feasibility, and the secondary… 
Commentary: Safety and feasibility of CRISPR-edited T cells in patients with refractory non-small-cell lung cancer
CRISPR/Cas9 ribonucleoprotein-mediated editing has been used to disrupt the PDCD1 gene encoding programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) in human T cells, resulting in a significantly reduced PD-1 expression
The first human trial of CRISPR-based cell therapy clears safety concerns as new treatment for late-stage lung cancer
  • Shenghui He
  • Medicine
    Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy
  • 2020
TLDR
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TLDR
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Therapeutic Genome Editing and In Vivo Delivery.
TLDR
This review aims to provide a summary of the mechanisms of genome editing, the reasons for the emerging interest in CRISPR/Cas9 compared to other engineered nucleases, the current progress in developing CRISpr/ Cas9 delivery systems, and the current preclinical and clinical applications of CRIS PR/cas9 genome editing.
CRISPR-Cas9: A Preclinical and Clinical Perspective for the Treatment of Human Diseases.
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This comprehensive review paper discusses the origin of CRISPR-Cas9 systems and their therapeutic potential against various genetic disorders, including cancer, allergy, immunological disorders, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, cardiovascular disorders, neurological disorders, liver-related disorders, cystic fibrosis, blood- related disorders, eye-related Disorders, and viral infection.
Erratic journey of CRISPR/Cas9 in oncology from bench-work to successful-clinical therapy.
TLDR
This review explores the literature around the mechanism of Nobel winning CRISPR/Cas9 and its journey from its discovery to various pre-clinical and clinical trials in oncology, focusing mostly on PD-1 knockout CAR-T cell therapy.
Cas9-directed immune tolerance in humans—a model to evaluate regulatory T cells in gene therapy?
TLDR
As a “beneficial alliance” beyond Cas9-immunity, antigen-specific Treg cells may serve as a living and targeted immunosuppressant to increase safety and efficacy of gene therapy.
Applications and challenges of CRISPR-Cas gene-editing to disease treatment in clinics
TLDR
The applications of CRISPR-Cas from bench to bedside is summarized and highlights the current obstacles that may limit the usage of CRispr-Cas systems as gene-editing toolkits in precision medicine and offer some viewpoints that may help to tackle these challenges and facilitate technical development.
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