Safety and efficacy of over- the-counter cough and cold medicines for use in children

@article{Vassilev2010SafetyAE,
  title={Safety and efficacy of over- the-counter cough and cold medicines for use in children},
  author={Zdravko P. Vassilev and Shaum M Kabadi and Raul Villa},
  journal={Expert Opinion on Drug Safety},
  year={2010},
  volume={9},
  pages={233 - 242}
}
Importance of the field: Over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medications have been used widely for years and continue to be a preferred choice for temporary relief of symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections in children. These medications are being placed under extraordinary scrutiny in the pediatric population due to the lack of conclusive evidence about their therapeutic efficacy and increased reports of associations with serious adverse events and even mortality. Areas covered in… 
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