Safety and efficacy of high-protein diets for weight loss

@article{Johnstone2012SafetyAE,
  title={Safety and efficacy of high-protein diets for weight loss},
  author={Alexandra M. Johnstone},
  journal={Proceedings of the Nutrition Society},
  year={2012},
  volume={71},
  pages={339 - 349}
}
  • A. Johnstone
  • Published 8 March 2012
  • Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Dietary strategies that can help reduce hunger and promote fullness are beneficial for weight control, since these are major limiting factors for success. High-protein (HP) diets, specifically those that maintain the absolute number of grams ingested, while reducing energy, are a popular strategy for weight loss (WL) due to the effects of protein-induced satiety to control hunger. Nonetheless, both the safety and efficacy of HP WL diets have been questioned, particularly in combination with low… 
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