Safety Assessment of Plant-Derived Fatty Acid Oils

@article{Burnett2017SafetyAO,
  title={Safety Assessment of Plant-Derived Fatty Acid Oils},
  author={Christina L. Burnett and Monice M. Fiume and Wilma Fowler Bergfeld and Donald V. Belsito and Ronald A. Hill and Curtis D. Klaassen and Daniel C. Liebler and James G. Marks and Ronald C. Shank and Thomas J. Slaga and Paul W. Snyder and F. Alan Andersen},
  journal={International Journal of Toxicology},
  year={2017},
  volume={36},
  pages={129S - 51S}
}
The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 244 plant-derived fatty acid oils as used in cosmetics. Oils are used in a wide variety of cosmetic products for their skin conditioning, occlusive, emollient, and moisturizing properties. Since many of these oils are edible, and their systemic toxicity potential is low, the review focused on potential dermal effects. The Panel concluded that the 244 plant-derived fatty acid oils are safe as used in cosmetics. 
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