Safer Cities: A Macro-Level Analysis of Recent Immigration, Hispanic-Owned Businesses, and Crime Rates in the United States

@article{Stansfield2014SaferCA,
  title={Safer Cities: A Macro-Level Analysis of Recent Immigration, Hispanic-Owned Businesses, and Crime Rates in the United States},
  author={Richard Stansfield},
  journal={Journal of Urban Affairs},
  year={2014},
  volume={36},
  pages={503 - 518}
}
  • R. Stansfield
  • Published 1 August 2014
  • Economics
  • Journal of Urban Affairs
ABSTRACT: As the literature examining the relationship between immigration and crime continues to evolve, scholars are now searching for ways to expand this link conceptually. Hand in hand with immigration, the number of Hispanic-owned businesses has grown at rates far exceeding the growth rate for all US businesses over the past two decades, carrying the expectation of local and national government officials of bringing jobs and revenue back into the economy. Yet research on how this growth in… Expand
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