Sadness and Susceptibility to Judgmental Bias: The Case of Anchoring

@article{Bodenhausen2000SadnessAS,
  title={Sadness and Susceptibility to Judgmental Bias: The Case of Anchoring},
  author={Galen V Bodenhausen and Shira Gabriel and Margaret D. Lineberger},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2000},
  volume={11},
  pages={320 - 323}
}
In a wide range of empirical paradigms, sadness has been associated with more extensive and detail-oriented thinking than happiness, resulting in reductions in judgmental bias that arise from reliance on stereotypes and other simple decision heuristics. It was hypothesized that anchoring would constitute a significant exception to this general pattern. Recent research on anchoring indicates that an active thought process underlies the emergence of this bias. If sad people are likely to think… Expand
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