SUSCEPTIBILITY OF WILD SONGBIRDS TO THE HOUSE FINCH STRAIN OF MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM

@inproceedings{Farmer2005SUSCEPTIBILITYOW,
  title={SUSCEPTIBILITY OF WILD SONGBIRDS TO THE HOUSE FINCH STRAIN OF MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM},
  author={Kristy L. Farmer and Geoffrey E. Hill and Sharon R. Roberts},
  booktitle={Journal of wildlife diseases},
  year={2005}
}
Conjunctivitis in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), caused by Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), was first reported in 1994 and, since this time, has become endemic in house finch populations throughout eastern North America. Although the house finch is most commonly associated with MG-related conjunctivitis, MG has been reported from other wild bird species, and conjunctivitis (not confirmed as MG related) has been reported in over 30 species. To help define the host range of the house finch… 

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