• Corpus ID: 46051401

SURGICAL MASK CONTACT DERMATITIS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CONTACT DERMATITIS IN HEALTHCARE WORKERS

@inproceedings{Badri2017SURGICALMC,
  title={SURGICAL MASK CONTACT DERMATITIS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CONTACT DERMATITIS IN HEALTHCARE WORKERS},
  author={Faisal M Al Badri},
  year={2017}
}
BACKGROUND A some reports suggest a decrease in the incidence of occupational skin diseases in Europe,1–3 they are still one of the most prevalent occupational diseases in developed countries.4,5 Occupational skin diseases represented 28.6% of all the reported occupational diseases in Germany in 2002.6 The annual estimated incidence rate for occupational skin-disease cases reported to compensation authorities in Europe is 0.5–1.9 per 1 000 full-time workers.4 However, under-reporting and under… 

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