SUGGESTIONS AS TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF RATES OF EVOLUTION

@article{Haldane1949SUGGESTIONSAT,
  title={SUGGESTIONS AS TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF RATES OF EVOLUTION},
  author={J. B. S. Haldane},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1949},
  volume={3}
}
The best known recent work on rates of evolution is probably that of Simpson (1944), though Small's (1945, 1946) work on diatoms is more extensive. Small is concerned with the origin of species, which in this group seems to be a sudden or almost sudden process. Simpson compares evolutionary rates in different groups mainly by means of data on the origin and extinction of genera. Now among living animals and plants the distinction between genera is much less objective than that between species… 

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