STRUCTURAL, BEHAVIORAL, AND PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS OF BEES (APOIDEA) FOR COLLECTING POLLEN'

@article{Thorp1979STRUCTURALBA,
  title={STRUCTURAL, BEHAVIORAL, AND PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS OF BEES (APOIDEA) FOR COLLECTING POLLEN'},
  author={Robbin W. Thorp},
  journal={Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden},
  year={1979},
  volume={66},
  pages={788-812}
}
  • R. Thorp
  • Published 1979
  • Biology
  • Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden
Bees, like their wasp relatives, forage for and transport food to a nest as provisions for their offspring. Unlike female Sphecoidea which transport arthropods one at a time as prey, bees transport pollen requiring specialized scopal (brush) or corbicular (fringed plate) structures to transport the dustlike material externally. Scopae often exhibit further modifications in density and amount of plumosity in relation to the size and ornamentation of the pollen grains they transport. Bees also… Expand
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Although the size of angiosperm pollen has influenced the morphology of bees, there is no evidence that the latter has influences the former. Expand
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Worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) were observed stealing pollen from the scopae of Diadasia enavata and Halictus ligatus on sunflowers, a phenomenon called cleptolecty, and the sunflower population declined rapidly during observations from late September to early October. Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
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TLDR
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TLDR
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