STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM'S INSTABILITY WITH FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX GIANT PLANETS

@article{Nesvorn2012STATISTICALSO,
  title={STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM'S INSTABILITY WITH FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX GIANT PLANETS},
  author={David Nesvorn{\'y} and Alessandro Morbidelli},
  journal={The Astronomical Journal},
  year={2012},
  volume={144}
}
Several properties of the solar system, including the wide radial spacing and orbital eccentricities of giant planets, can be explained if the early solar system evolved through a dynamical instability followed by migration of planets in the planetesimal disk. Here we report the results of a statistical study, in which we performed nearly 104 numerical simulations of planetary instability starting from hundreds of different initial conditions. We found that the dynamical evolution is typically… 

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