SPLENECTOMY AND SUBSEQUENT MORTALITY IN VETERANS OF THE 1939-45 WAR

@article{Robinette1977SPLENECTOMYAS,
  title={SPLENECTOMY AND SUBSEQUENT MORTALITY IN VETERANS OF THE 1939-45 WAR},
  author={C. Robinette and J. Fraumeni},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={1977},
  volume={310},
  pages={127-129}
}
A long-term follow-up of 740 American servicemen splenectomised because of trauma during the 1939-45 war showed a significant excess mortality from pneumonia and ischaemic heart-disease. Mortality from cirrhosis was also increased, but not significantly. The findings confirm that the risk of fatal infections is increased by asplenia; however, the risk of cancer was not increased, as it is in some other immunodeficiency states. Post-splenectomy thrombocytosis and hypercoagulability may account… Expand
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The data support the concept of preserving the traumatized spleen whenever possible, andSeptic morbidity and mortality rates in splenectomized patients were significantly greater than those in 2,368 consecutive trauma patients treated from 1978 to 1979. Expand
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  • 2014
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There has been an increased tendency in recent years towards splenic preservation to prevent not only the risk of subsequent overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) but the long term risk of cardiovascular complications. Expand
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A retrospective study to evaluate the effect splenectomy has on postoperative infections, azathioprine tolerance, and graft survival in a small series of renal transplant recipients concluded that the risk of developing such a complication was similar in each group. Expand
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It is concluded that fulminant sepsis after splenectomy for trauma in adults is indeed a potential risk and that all such patients should receive penicillin prophylaxis and pneumococcal vaccine. Expand
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TLDR
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Beside the increased risk of infection there are further long lasting consequences of splenectomy. The hematologic changes include morphological alterations of red cells, lymphocytosis, monocytosisExpand
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