SPERMATOPHORE SIZE IN BUSHCRICKETS: COMPARATIVE EVIDENCE FOR NUPTIAL GIFTS AS A SPERM PROTECTION DEVICE

@article{Wedell1993SPERMATOPHORESI,
  title={SPERMATOPHORE SIZE IN BUSHCRICKETS: COMPARATIVE EVIDENCE FOR NUPTIAL GIFTS AS A SPERM PROTECTION DEVICE},
  author={Nina Wedell},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1993},
  volume={47}
}
  • N. Wedell
  • Published 1 August 1993
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution
During courtship and copulation, males of many insect species provide the female with a nuptial gift of a prey item or synthesized material. These gifts may be explained as a form of paternal investment by increasing female reproductive output, or in terms of mating effort by increasing male fertilization success. These explanations, while not mutually exclusive, are controversial. While experimental studies examine the maintenance of nuptial gifts in single species, comparative studies are… Expand
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  • Biology
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  • Biology, Medicine
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The view that tettigoniids provide excellent models to test and understand the economics of matings in both sexes is reinforced, focussing on nuptial gifts, their trade-off with male calling songs, protandry and how mate density influences mate choice. Expand
Material benefit of mating: the bushcricket spermatophylax as a fast uptake nuptial gift
TLDR
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Spermatophore characteristics in bushcrickets vary with parasitism
TLDR
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