SPERM COMPETITION AND ITS EVOLUTIONARY CONSEQUENCES IN THE INSECTS

@article{Parker1970SPERMCA,
  title={SPERM COMPETITION AND ITS EVOLUTIONARY CONSEQUENCES IN THE INSECTS},
  author={George Parker},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={1970},
  volume={45}
}
  • G. Parker
  • Published 1970
  • Biology
  • Biological Reviews
The possible advantages to a species of internal rather than external fertilization have frequently been stressed, though one important point appears persistently to have escaped comment. In terms of sexual rather than natural selection, copulation with internal fertilization may have arisen by a selective advantage conferred upon males able to eject sperm nearer to th eova than did their fellow males. Such a selective advantage would still operate in situations where virtually all ova are… 
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