Corpus ID: 42983570

SOME ANATOMICAL CHARACTERS OF THE CUCULIDAE AND THE MUSOPHAGIDAE

@inproceedings{Andrew2002SOMEAC,
  title={SOME ANATOMICAL CHARACTERS OF THE CUCULIDAE AND THE MUSOPHAGIDAE},
  author={Andrew and J. and BergC},
  year={2002}
}
AND THE MUSOPHAGIDAE BY ANDREW J. BERGERl M OST authors have placed the African touracos (“plantain-eaters”) and the cosmopolitan cuckoos in a single order, the Cuculiformes or Cuculi (e.g., Mayr and Amadon, 1951, Wetmore, 1951). Bannerman (1933)) Moreau (1938,1958), Lowe (1943)) and Verheyen (1956a, 19563)) however, believed that the touracos deserve ordinal rank, the Musophagiformes. I agree with these authors but not for some of the reasons they cite. I have been interested in the anatomy… Expand

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