SOCIAL BEHAVIOR IN AMBLYPYGIDS, AND A REASSESSMENT OF ARACHNID SOCIAL PATTERNS

@inproceedings{Rayor2006SOCIALBI,
  title={SOCIAL BEHAVIOR IN AMBLYPYGIDS, AND A REASSESSMENT OF ARACHNID SOCIAL PATTERNS},
  author={Linda S. Rayor and Lisa A. Taylor},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract Aggregation, extended mother-offspring-sibling interactions, and complex social behaviors are extremely rare among arachnids. We report and quantify for the first time in Amblypygi prolonged mother-offspring-sibling associations, active aggregation, and frequent “amicable” (tolerant, nonaggressive) tactile interactions in two species: Phrynus marginemaculatus C.L. Koch 1840 (Phrynidae) and Damon diadema (Simon, 1876) (Phrynichidae). Sociality is characterized by frequent contact and… Expand
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