SLV330, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, ameliorates deficits in the T-maze, object recognition and Social Recognition Tasks in rodents

@article{Bruin2010SLV330AC,
  title={SLV330, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, ameliorates deficits in the T-maze, object recognition and Social Recognition Tasks in rodents},
  author={N.M.W.J. de Bruin and Jos Prickaerts and Jos H. M. Lange and Sven Akkerman and Emile Andriambeloson and Michelle de Haan and J. Wijnen and Marlies Van Drimmelen and Elias Hissink and Liesbeth Heijink and Cornelis Gerrit Kruse},
  journal={Neurobiology of Learning and Memory},
  year={2010},
  volume={93},
  pages={522-531}
}

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